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Reptiland Roundup: Turtles and Tortoises

Happy International Turtle & Tortoise Week!

In honor of International Turtle and Tortoise Week, we wanted to show off all the wonderful species of turtles and tortoises we have here at the zoo. What’s the difference between the two? The main thing that distinguishes a turtle from a tortoise is that turtles live in water at least some of the time while tortoises live on land. Read on to learn more about the species we have here!

Turtles

Alligator Snapping Turtle

Alligator snappers are among the heaviest freshwater turtles in the world, weighing an average of 45 lbs. These powerful animals can bite through the handle of a broom! You can find ours in the exhibit gallery.

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Eastern box turtle

Even though Eastern box turtles are turtles, they spend most of their lives on land. This turtle has a very high human-induced mortality rate, so it is actually illegal to catch them from the wild and keep them as pets. See our box turtles in the outdoor pond exhibit!

 

Florida softshell turtle

The Florida softshell turtle is a freshwater turtle with a long neck and a snorkel-like nose. The females get considerably larger than the males—females weigh an average of 15 lbs, while males only average about 6 lbs. You can find ours in the exhibit gallery, but you may need to look closely—sometimes they burrow under the pebbles!

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Mata mata turtle

The mata mata turtle is an aquatic turtle that prefers shallow, stagnant or slow-moving bodies of water. Mata mata turtles cannot chew due to the structure of their mouths, so they suction feed. You can find ours in the exhibit gallery!

 

Painted turtle

Painted turtles are a freshwater turtle native to the United States. Four U.S. states have actually named the painted turtle their state reptile! Find our painted turtles basking in the sun in the outdoor pond exhibit on warm days.

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Pond slider turtle

The pond slider turtle is a common semi-aquatic turtle with a few different subspecies. These turtles are extremely popular in the pet trade, but conservationists warn against pet owners releasing them into the wild since they are an invasive species. Find our many rescued pond slider turtles in the outdoor pond exhibit!

 

Snake-necked turtle

The snake-necked turtle is named for its long, flexible neck. Our particular species of snake-necked turtle, chelodina mccordi, is one of the most sought-after turtles in the exotic pet trade. Because of this, they are critically endangered. Ours are swimming in the exhibit gallery!

 

Wood turtle

Wood turtles are a North American species of turtle that can be found near shallow, clear streams of water. Humans and other animals pose a significant threat to the wood turtle at all stages of its life. If unharmed, these turtles can live for 40 years in the wild and up to 58 in captivity. You can see ours in the outdoor pond exhibit!

Tortoises

Aldabra tortoise

Aldabra tortoises are one of the largest species of tortoise in the world, similar in size to the Galapagos tortoise! You can find our fully grown Aldabra tortoises, Al and Henry, in the Island Giants building. We even have a few young Aldabras who have not reached their full size yet in our exhibit gallery!

 

Forest tortoise

The forest tortoise is the sixth-largest species of tortoise on earth. These tortoises have a unique sound—they can make a noise that sounds like a baby cooing with a raspy voice. You can find ours hanging out with the iguanas in the exhibit gallery!

Indian star tortoise

The Indian star tortoise is an endangered species of tortoise due to its popularity in the exotic pet trade. The unique shape of their shell assists them in righting themselves when they get turned over. You can find ours in the exhibit gallery!

We hope you enjoyed learning more about our turtles and tortoises. Help us celebrate International Turtle and Tortoise Week by visiting them here at the zoo!